The Nourished Kitchen’s Baked Oats with Pistachios, Dried Figs, and Honey {Exclusive Recipe}

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What more can you say about a book so gorgeous, so delicious, and so chock-full of traditional cooking farm-to-table recipes -- other than <em>get it now</em>? Oh, but never fear, I think I can find a few more words to tempt you. The book is "The Nourished Kitchen" by Jennifer McGruther, and with a release date of Tues, Apr 15, you are within days of holding your own copy. Plus, you can get pre-order perks if you order by Tues 4/15. See the post for details.

What more can you say about a book so gorgeous, so delicious, and so chock-full of traditional cooking farm-to-table recipes — other than get it now?

Oh, but never fear, I think I can find a few more words to tempt and entice you.

The book is The Nourished Kitchen by Jennifer McGruther, and I’m thrilled to be holding a review copy right now. You can order yours here (released April 15, 2014).

Let’s talk about the book itself, and then I’ve got an exclusive recipe to share with you.

About The Nourished Kitchen

I want to tell you how humbly (and brilliantly) this book is sectioned. Rather than by season or dish, you’ll find true farm-to-table categories of source — the garden, the pasture, the range, the waters, the fields, the wild, the orchard, and the larder.

Within the sections, you’ll find nutrient-dense dishes featuring raw dairy, traditional fats, organ and muscle meat, fish, whole and ancient grains, seasonal fruits, and fresh herbs.

With beautiful photos and explanations, Jenny guides you to creating homemade yogurts, simple cheeses, butter, broths, fermented vegetables, and much more. Her book contains more than 160 mouth-watering recipes, including the one below.

Because of its beauty and practicality, it’s a book you will never outgrow. I am certain of that. You’ll treasure it and be loathe to loan it out for fear it won’t be returned!

And conversely, it’s the type of loaned book someone would not want to return. (So don’t be that person — get your own! ;) )

Jenny and her publisher said yes to my request to share an exclusive recipe from the book, and below you’ll see the one I chose… oh, my, the flavors are heaven and the dish pure comfort and nourishment in the morning (or for a snack).

What more can you say about a book so gorgeous, so delicious, and so chock-full of traditional cooking farm-to-table recipes -- other than <em>get it now</em>? Oh, but never fear, I think I can find a few more words to tempt you. The book is "The Nourished Kitchen" by Jennifer McGruther, and with a release date of Tues, Apr 15, you are within days of holding your own copy. Plus, you can get pre-order perks if you order by Tues 4/15. See the post for details.

Baked Oats with Pistachios, Dried, Figs, and Honey

Dense, chewy, and cake-like, these oat bars are always a favorite in my home. I reserve them for busy weekends when visiting guests stumble out of their slumber and into the kitchen for breakfast. They cut away a square, then top it with honey or yogurt and more fruit. It’s a favorite of my father, and one I always make especially for him when he visits—sometimes substituting walnuts for pistachios, or apricots and raisins for figs. –Jenny McGruther, author of The Nourished Kitchen

  • 8 cups steel-cut oats
  • 1 cup pistachios
  • 1/4 cup yogurt
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon finely ground unrefined sea salt
  • 6 eggs, beaten
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 1 orange
  • 1 cup chopped dried
  • Mission figs
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, plus more for greasing

Serves 6 to 8. 

Spoon the oats into a large mixing bowl, toss in the pistachios, and cover with warm water by 2 inches. Stir in the yogurt and cover the bowl with a kitchen towel. Set the bowl in a warm spot in your kitchen and allow the oats and pistachios to soak for at least 8 and up to 12 hours.

Drain the oat mixture in a fine-mesh sieve, rinse well, and return it to the mixing bowl.

Preheat the oven to 375°F and grease a 9 by 13-inch baking dish with butter.

Stir the cinnamon, salt, eggs, milk, and honey into the oat mixture until well blended. Finely grate the zest of the orange, placing it in a bowl. Cut the orange in half crosswise and squeeze the juice into the bowl holding the zest. Stir both the orange zest and juice into the oat mixture, then fold in the figs. Spoon the mixture into the prepared baking dish and smooth the top. Cut the butter into small pieces and scatter them over the surface.

Bake for 40 to 45 minutes, until golden brown at the edges and slightly wobbly at the center. Allow to cool for 5 minutes before serving. Baked oats will keep, covered, in the refrigerator for up to 1 week. (To reheat leftovers, cut a square of the baked oats. Drop a tablespoon of butter into a skillet and heat it over medium heat until frothy. Place the oat square in the skillet and cook until warmed through, about 3 minutes.)

Reprinted with permission from The Nourished Kitchen written and photographed by Jennifer McGruther (Ten Speed Press, © 2014).

Have you ordered The Nourished Kitchen yet? Are you excited? Which section or aspect interests you most?

This post may contain affiliate links. We only recommend products and services we wholeheartedly endorse. Thank you for supporting Traditional Cooking School by GNOWFGLINS with your purchases. Our family thanks you!

Comments

  1. says

    I just completed my pre-order through Amazon. I believe I will like this book and use it often since I pull meals from the garden on a daily basis.
    Cheers,
    izzi~avis

  2. Avis Peterson via Facebook says

    I just completed my pre-order through Amazon. I believe I will like this book and use it often since I pull meals from the garden on a daily basis.
    Cheers,
    izzi~avis
    Winthrop Washington

    • says

      If you only eat natural whole organic nutrient dense foods,drink plenty of good water (with unrefined salt added to to balance your minerals) and listen to your body’s needs, you won’t need to count calories. Your body will naturally reduce or gain what it needs to return to balance. You may need to leave off foods your body is sensitive to like grains, eggs or dairy, but that is part of listening to your body. Good fortune

  3. Dona says

    This sound delicious!!! I do have two questions……..I thought I read somewhere that you shouldn’t soak steel cut oats. I usually only buy rolled oats, w
    ould this recipe work with rolled oats?

  4. says

    Looks delicious. Even doesn’t have what I am allergic to which is even better cos I can try it if i really wanna, it looks delicious and i think i do wanna try it out.

  5. Nat Yusop via Facebook says

    What a wholesome recipe! It’s difficult to get steel cut oats in my neck of the woods here in Kuala Lumpur. Would rolled oats work just as well ?

  6. Nicole says

    I can’t believe that you do not once link to the actual baked oatmeal recipe posted on the nourished kitchen’s blog. Annoying.

  7. says

    Wardee,
    I made this recipe and wonder if the 8 cups of oats is correct. I find the dish very dense and I couldn’t fit it all into and 9 x 13 pan. I’m sure it would easily feed 12 hungry lumberjacks. Any thoughts?

  8. Gorge says

    why do you soak the oats? Soaking oats doesn’t have any effect on phytic acid content, unless you can reference the contrary?

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