Hard Honey Candies (plus other gifts from the heart)

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Hard Honey Candies plus Other Gifts from the Heart | Most of the time, my gifts go straight to someone else's belly. ;) Recently, I turned old flour sacks into gift bags filled with scrumptious goodies. Inside my gift bags, I placed homemade maple roasted almonds, apricot and cranberry granola, and... these delicious hard honey candies. They were well-received and fun to make as well! | GNOWFGLINS.com

I love sharing gifts with loved ones, no matter what time of year. Most of the time, my gifts go straight to someone else’s belly. ;)

What could be better than receiving — or giving — a simple, traditional, handcrafted gift? Even handwritten cards are becoming a thing of the past, but I think it is important to keep these traditions alive.

It warms my heart to craft something unique and special for someone, whether it be knitted, carved, painted, penciled, or baked. With each gift, I wrap up a whole lot of love and care.

Baking has become something of an art in our home, so I often give cookies, breads, or candies to friends or family. Plus, I keep an eye out for little trinkets at local antique stores or thrift stores that would suit the special someone, and I add those along with handmade gift tags.

My most recent idea for gifting is to turn old flour sacks into gift bags filled with scrumptious goodies. They were well-received and fun to make as well!

Hard Honey Candies plus Other Gifts from the Heart | Most of the time, my gifts go straight to someone else's belly. ;) Recently, I turned old flour sacks into gift bags filled with scrumptious goodies. Inside my gift bags, I placed homemade maple roasted almonds, apricot and cranberry granola, and... these delicious hard honey candies. They were well-received and fun to make as well! | GNOWFGLINS.com

At an antique store, I found many old, small flour sacks at an unbelievable price. I bought them, washed them, and learned how to embroider a simple wildflower pattern on them. I coordinated the color of the flowers with the recipients’ favorite colors. I love knowing that these gifts came through my own kitchen — from a kitchen long ago. If only each bag could share the story of where it has already been!

Interested in trying this but can’t find old flour sacks? These muslin produce bags would look lovely embroidered, too. Or you could embroider on plain white flour sack towels — bundling up your goodies with a ribbon.

Inside my gift bags I placed homemade maple roasted almonds, apricot and cranberry granola, and… these delicious hard honey candies.

Hard Honey Candies

  • 1 cup honey
  • 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla (optional)

Add the honey and vinegar to a sauce pan and heat it to a boil. Reduce the heat so that the ingredients are still boiling, but not scorching. Check the temperature with a candy thermometer. When it gets between 250 degrees Fahrenheit and 275 degrees Fahrenheit, turn the burner off and remove the pot from the heat. Let sit for a minute and then add vanilla (important so the vanilla doesn’t scorch). Stir the candy, line a container with parchment paper, and pour the candy over top. Place in the refrigerator or freezer. Or use cookie cutters or molds to turn your candy into shapes, like the heart shape pictured above.

What handmade gifts do you love to give and receive?

Also see: Wrapping and Packaging Food Gifts

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Comments

  1. says

    These candies are really cool. I’ve never made candy before, but I’m wondering if you could add some essential oils to make cough or throat drops. I’ve been sick lately and the Burts Bees drops are working, but I’m really not feeling great about the undisclosed ingredients and would love to make my own.

    • Tammy Trayer says

      Thanks so much for your comment. I totally understand your concerns with the packaged drops today and yes I feel that you could add essential oils to your drops. I am actually planning to do the same for my husband. If I add essential oils to mine, I believe that I will eliminate the vinegar and just add a tsp of butter while it is heating on the stove which will help keep the foam down and then you would add the essential oils once it has been removed from the heat and has had a chance to cool down just a bit. I am considering using Thieves and/or Lemon and/or Eucalyptus. I hope this helps and I hope you enjoy. Homemade candies are the BEST in my opinion and they are so easy to make. God bless you and yours… <3

    • Tammy Trayer says

      Tanya go for it!! I LOVE making homemade candies. It is fun and they are favored in our house. I’ll have to share my Mint Patties sometime. Blessings to you and yours. <3

  2. Andrea says

    Ooh! I’m due to have my baby any day now, they say hard candy is good for dry mouth during labor but I would never use store bought, the honey will be great!!

    • Tammy Trayer says

      Hi Sara,
      I apologize for my delayed response. Our family has been fighting the flu. Funny you should ask about using maple syrup instead. My girlfriend was working on a post covering just that. You can pretty much do things the same, but I will provide you with a link to her post because her pouring methods are a bit different and if you have children, could be a fun project. You can check out her method here: http://www.theselfsufficienthomeacre.com/2014/02/how-to-make-jack-wax-and-hard-maple-candy.html. If her method of pouring is not what you are looking for, you can certainly use my suggestions as well with the maple syrup.

      Thank you so much for stopping by and I hope this was helpful for you.

      Blessings to you and yours!
      Tam <3

  3. Maggie says

    I’m so bummed out. My honey candies did not harden. They satiated gooey. I suspect my honey is not real, or I didn’t boil it long enough! Can you give me some insight? Please!!!!
    Thank you , I love your posts!!!!

  4. Karen says

    What kind of honey do you need to use to make the honey candies? I have creamed honey– will that work? Also wondering when to use the shape cutters… Do you wait for the honey to cool on the parchment paper for 5 or 10 minutes before cutting it? I’m looking forward to trying this since I suspect that my daughter might have sucrose intolerance and I need some substitutes for candy.

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