KYF #035: Foods and Recipes We’re Loving

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strawberry-leather

In this episode of Know Your Food with Wardee, I’m sharing the foods and recipes we’re loving lately. We all go through seasons of what we like to eat, and my family is no different. So here’s a peek onto our plates. This is a short episode — an easy one to fit in!

Plus I gave a bit of a garden update (getting the garden ready).

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Recipes Mentioned

Here are the recipes I mentioned in this episode. The audio version contains more!

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muesli

Soaked Muesli

  • 5 cups rolled oats
  • 3 cups raw whole milk (add 3 tablespoons raw apple cider vinegar, lemon juice, yogurt, or Kombucha if not raw) — or blend of milk and water
  • 1/4 cup raisins or other dried fruit
  • 1 tablespoon cinnamon
  • raw honey
  • additional raw milk or yogurt for serving
  • fresh fruit

Serves 4 to 5. Adapted from Autoimmune: The Cause and The Cure, by Annesse Brockley and Krisin Urdiales.

In large mixing bowl, combine oats and milk. Press oats down into milk so they’re submerged. Cover. Let soak overnight at room temperature. Soak in fridge if room temperature is more than 78 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit. In the morning, add raisins and cinnamon. Stir. Scoop into bowls. Top with raw honey and additional raw milk and fresh fruit. Or serve with yogurt.

ranch-salad

Ranch Dressing

  • 1 cup sour cream or soft cheese
  • 2 to 4 tablespoons raw milk
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon basil

Yields 1 cup.

Whisk all ingredients together, adjusting amount of milk for desired consistency. Refrigerate until needed.

Homemade Sausage Patties

  • 2 pounds ground meat
  • 1 to 2 teaspoons sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon rubbed sage
  • 2/3 teaspoon rubbed summer savory
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1 teaspoon ground marjoram
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1/2 tsp dried parsley and 1/2 tsp dried thyme (optional)
  • (Optional olive or coconut oil for lean meats – approx. 1 to 2 teaspoons per pound of meat)

Yield: 20 patties. Recipe courtesy of Peggy M., Jupiter, FL., who writes: “I usually make a large batch (8 to10 pounds), form the patties, then freeze them individually on trays. Once frozen, I put them in a freezer bag and keep them in the freezer, pulling out what we need.”

Mix well, and form into 20 patties. For lean meat, start with a low flame, then finish over medium-high heat to brown, or broil on middle oven rack. Try not to overcook; they should be nice and juicy.

How to Grill Grass-Fed Hamburgers to Perfection

  • 4 pounds grass-fed ground beef
  • 2 to 3 teaspoons sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 3 cloves crushed garlic (optional)
  • 1 tablespoon dried parsley or 3 tablespoons fresh, chopped parsley (optional)

Excerpted from Real Food Kids eCourse. And Fundamentals II eCourse has a BBQ steaks video showing how to set up and use the charcoal grill for grass-fed grilling of steaks (which is similar).

Fast and hot is the best way to retain moisture and tenderness in grass-fed burgers or steak, and the following methods help you achieve this.

Gas grill instructions: Preheat the grill to 425 to 450 degrees Fahrenheit. Add the burgers and grill 3 to 3-1/2 minutes with the lid on. Set a timer so you don’t forget them. Do not press on them. Do not move them. We want the juices to get sealed inside. After 3 minutes, flip the burgers and cook another 3 to 3-1/2 minutes, again with the lid on. After this, the burgers will be medium-rare. For well-done burgers, shut off the grill or move the burgers to the cool side of the grill, shut the lid and let cook another 3 to 5 minutes. Before serving, let your burgers rest, covered, in a warm area for 3 to 5 minutes. This is a good time to toast buns if you’re using them.

Charcoal grill instructions: Make a pyramid of at least 50 briquets (for a 22-inch diameter grill). Light the briquets and give them at least a half hour to get going — they should be very hot, mostly grey, and smoldering. Scrape them to one side of the grill and spread them out so they provide direct heat for half the grill’s surface. Add the burgers to the side of the grill that is over the briquets. Grill 3 to 3-1/2 minutes, with the lid on. Set a timer so you don’t forget them. Do not press on them. Do not move them. We want the juices to get sealed inside. After 3 minutes, flip the burgers and cook another 3 to 3-1/2 minutes, again with the lid on. After this, the burgers will be medium-rare. For well-done burgers, move the burgers to the other side (where there are no briquets), shut the lid and let cook another 3 to 5 minutes. Before serving, let your burgers rest, covered, in a warm area for 3 to 5 minutes. This is a good time to toast buns if you’re using them.

What’s Coming Up!

Next week my guest is nutritional therapist Lydia Shatney. We’re talking about gut healing and digestive complaints, all of which her online class Heal Your Gut (opening soon) will address.

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Anything to Add?

What foods and recipes are you enjoying and loving? Feel free to add links in the comments. Also, how is your garden growing? Please share — I’d love to hear!

Like this podcast? Please help me reach others by using the share buttons at the top of this post. Thanks!

This post may contain affiliate links. We only recommend products and services we wholeheartedly endorse. Thank you for supporting Traditional Cooking School by GNOWFGLINS with your purchases. Our family thanks you!

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Comments

  1. Elaine says

    Any suggestions for an “easier on the adjusting tastebuds” beet recipe and fermented recipe? We’re fairly new to the whole, real food direction from a typical low fat/carb, processed food norm and can’t seem to find a way for these to succeed in our home? :0/

    • says

      Elaine — Fermented carrots seems to be easier on the tastebuds, more mild. Why don’t you try shredding carrots, mixing with ginger and maybe garlic. Add 1 tablespoon of sea salt per 4 cups of mixture, put in a jar, and ferment a few days.

  2. Betty-Anne Bod says

    Hi Wardee
    Thank you for inspiring us in the beginning of the growing season. So far we have been enjoying adding chives to our salads and recipes. We had our first crop of radishes and the next crop is growing quickly. I have hung thyme, chocolate mint and oregano to dry already. My tomato plants are three feet high and I am planning to de-hydrate most of them this year. Your lesson about how easy it is to re- hydrate them and have sauce or paste very quickly made me re-think processing them by canning and we can enjoy sun dried tomato’s on our pizza. I am going to make strawberry fruit leather as it is portable and will make a wonderful snack for my grandsons when we are on the road..Thanks for all your wonderful ways to help our families enjoy delicious, healthy food. I am proud of all your efforts Wardee!

Trackbacks

  1. [...] In this episode of Know Your Food with Wardee, I’m sharing the foods and recipes we’re loving lately. We all go through seasons of what we like to eat, and my family is no different. So here’s a peek onto our plates. This is a short episode — an easy one to fit in! Listen to this episode. [...]

  2. […] Homemade museli. All I could say was wow, what genius! Soak some oats (gluten-free in my case) overnight and then add in whatever I may want to eat with it in the morning.  Even with the oncoming autumn and drop in temperatures, I think I am going to continue using this method of preparation instead of making hot oatmeal for myself. […]

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