Basic Whole Grain Tollhouse Cookies (Sprouted)

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sprouted-tollhouse-cookiesA variation of a variation of a variation of Natural Tollhouse Cookies. :D

A note about gluten-intolerance. My daughter, who is gluten-intolerant, can eat these safely. (That’s not to say all gluten-intolerant individuals would have similar results.) The gluten grains are sprouted and dehydrated prior to becoming flour. I also soak and dehydrate the rolled oats ahead of time.

See all basic recipes.

  • 1 cup unrefined, virgin coconut oil, softened
  • 1/2 cup raw honey
  • 1/4 cup flax seed meal + 3/4 cup pure water OR 3 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 2-1/4 cups sprouted whole grain flour (such as wheat, kamut, spelt, or emmer)
  • 1/2 cup acceptable chocolate chips
  • 1/2 cup raisins (or another 1/2 cup chocolate chips)
  • 1/2 cup chopped nuts
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened coconut
  • 1/2 cup quinoa flakes or soaked-n-ready oats

Cream together coconut oil and honey in mixing bowl.

In a small bowl, whisk together the flax seed meal and water thoroughly (if using). Let sit for five minutes to thicken. Add the flax seed/water mixture OR eggs to mixing bowl, along with vanilla, and beat.

Combine flour, baking soda and salt in a medium size bowl. Fluff with fork. Add to wet ingredients in mixing bowl and mix until just combined.

Add chocolate chips, nuts, coconut, and quinoa/oats flakes to mixing bowl. Mix gently until just incorporated.

Drop by tablespoons full onto greased cookie sheet. Bake at 350 degrees for 12 to 15 minutes.

For bar cookies: press mixture into (1) greased 9″ by 13″ pan or (2) greased 8″ square pans. Bake at 350 degrees for 20 to 30 minutes, until browned on top and inserted toothpick comes out cleanly.

© Copyright 2009-2010 by Wardee Harmon. All rights reserved.

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Comments

  1. gabrielle says

    hi Wardee. i am curious why you dont use the oats in this version and use quinoa flakes instead? do you think oats could be used with similar results? thanks!

    • says

      Gabrielle,

      The reason I don’t use the oats is because unless one purchases certified gluten-free oats, there is likely gluten in the oats (from oat crops being grown in rotation with wheat crops). We could buy gluten-free oats, but they are soooo expensive. So I use quinoa flakes instead. I know those are gluten-free and I like the grain diversity, too.

      The original recipe for Natural Tollhouse Cookies calls for rolled oats and they’re really good that way. :D

  2. gabrielle says

    oh, ok. thanks. we dont have any allergies around here (thank goodness) so i dont worry about gluten. actually, i do have a slight dairy intolerance but only if i overload on commercial dairy…

  3. MarLou says

    Wardee,
    I’m going to try these. They sound very nutritious. I’ll let you know who they turn out. Thanks a lot for your great recipes.
    MarLou

  4. Heather says

    That is interesting to read about your daughters gluten intolerance. My son also has a gluten intolerance but is not celiac. He can eat whole wheat sourdough bread with no problems. I am wondering if this is also the case for your daughter? I have read that the process removes some of the gluten but not sure how much. Does she seem to do well with all sprouted grains too?

    • says

      Heather — This is the case with my daughter. If the grains (no matter which gluten grains) are soaked, sprouted or fermented, she can eat them without symptoms. These processes don’t remove the gluten, but they do partially digest it, preparing it for our own digestion.

Trackbacks

  1. [...] Sprouted Cookies. I made these a few times this weekend. So good! I didn’t have chocolate chips, so used coarsely chopped dark chocolate rounds. That worked. Once I didn’t have soaked and ready oats, so I just omitted them. Also, I used Rapadura instead of honey. I’ll post that updated recipe soon – you’re going to want to try these cookies. [...]

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